Based in Sydney, Australia, Foundry is a blog by Rebecca Thao. Her posts explore modern architecture through photos and quotes by influential architects, engineers, and artists.

5 Reasons Why The View Needs An All-Male Spinoff

Original unedited photo courtesy of ABC

Original unedited photo courtesy of ABC

The View has been stirring up controversy since 1997 and is still going strong with resident moron Raven-Symoné ruffling feathers almost daily.  It's likely impossible that you don't know what The View is, but in case you don't, here's the rundown: It's a morning roundtable talk show with an all-female cast that interviews subjects and, more famously, dives into some rather heated discussions about current events, politics, women's issues, and celebrity.  The show often makes headlines for its constantly rotating hosts and the on-air squabbles between them.  And though the show can sometimes be counterproductive, it has given women a national platform to discuss important issues and represents many facets of the female population from age to diversity to work experience.  

ABC tried to recreate the success of The View from a male perspective with The Other Half.  But the formula didn't translate, and the show met its demise after only two seasons.  Despite that show's failure, there's still a market opportunity for this to succeed.  Perhaps the odds of success are even greater now than they were back in 2010 when The Other Half launched.  Here's why:

1. Masculinity is being challenged in so many ways and it needs to be discussed...by men.

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I'm all for The View, so please don't mistake this for a misogynistic viewpoint in even the slightest bit.  But I think it would be incredibly interesting to hear a panel of men discuss Kanye's Twitter rants, Trump's presidential campaign antics, and Peyton Manning's tears during the Super Bowl.  We need to hear what other men think.

2. We care about more than sports.

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GiPHY

Well, I don't really keep up with sports at all.  I mean, hello, this is a fashion blog.  But currently, the only place where we can really see a group of men convene and share their opinions is ESPN.  We have more to offer than sports commentary.  A morning talk show platform could offer some depth and peel back the layers of the onion for a national audience.

3. With our magazines dying off one by one, we need our voice represented somewhere.

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We've already lost Details.  And we're even losing some of our favorite sites like Four Pins.  Our market is being challenged in both print and digital formats.  It's high time we take on TV.

4. Dr. Phil, Dr. Oz, and Steve Harvey do not represent us.

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These men represent the range of successful men in daytime TV.  Steve Harvey is preaching 1950s values about how women should live their lives and find love.  Dr. Oz is always under fire for his product endorsements and factually inaccurate stories.  Dr. Phil's show is barely a step above Jerry Springer. Gone are the days of Montel Williams, Geraldo Rivera, and the age of male daytime talk show host. We can do better.  So much better.

5. The show can be a platform for men's health issues.

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The life expectancy of men is 5 years less than that of women.  We are plagued by heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, cancer, and a multitude of other afflictions that can be prevented.  More than just debating hot celebrity topics, this show could really bring men's health issues to the forefront and lead to some positive change.

So what do you say? Are you in agreement, and if so, who would be on your panel? Let me know in the comments!

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